Menu iconMenu iconPython Programming Unlocked for Beginners
Python Programming Unlocked for Beginners

Chapter 10: Python Best Practices

10.3: Naming Conventions

In Python, it is incredibly important to use clear and descriptive names for variables, functions, classes, and modules. Doing so will make your code more readable and maintainable, which is crucial for any project. However, it's not just about using descriptive names - it's also about being consistent throughout your code.

By adopting a consistent naming convention, you can help other developers understand and contribute to your project more efficiently. Luckily, As we described before, Python has a set of widely-accepted naming conventions, which are covered in PEP 8. This section will provide a more detailed discussion of these conventions, and how they can be applied to your code to make it more readable and maintainable.

10.3.1: Variables and functions:

Use lowercase letters and separate words with underscores (snake_case). This convention makes your code easy to read and understand. For example:

filename = "example.txt"
counter = 0

def process_data(data):
    pass

10.3.2: Constants: 

Constants should be named using uppercase letters and underscores to separate words. This convention makes it easy to distinguish constants from other variables.

PI = 3.14159
MAX_SIZE = 1000 

10.3.3: Classes:

Use CamelCase (capitalizing the first letter of each word) for class names. This convention helps distinguish class names from variable and function names.

class MyClass:
    pass

class CustomerData:
    pass

10.3.4: Modules:

Module names should be lowercase and can use underscores if it improves readability. This convention keeps module names consistent with variable and function names.

# my_module.py
import my_module

10.3.5: Private variables and methods:

To indicate that a variable or method is private (i.e., not meant to be accessed directly), you can use a single leading underscore. This is a convention rather than a strict rule, but it helps communicate the intended use of the variable or method to other developers.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self._private_variable = 42

    def _private_method(self):
        pass

By following these naming conventions, you'll improve the readability and maintainability of your Python code. This can save time and effort in the long run, especially when working in a team or revisiting code after a period of time. It's important to be consistent with these conventions throughout your codebase to ensure a coherent and professional appearance.

This consistency can also aid in debugging and troubleshooting, as well as reduce the likelihood of errors or confusion caused by inconsistent naming. Additionally, adhering to standard naming conventions can make it easier for others to understand and contribute to your code, as they will be familiar with the naming conventions used. Therefore, it's recommended to take the time to learn and follow these conventions, as they can have a significant impact on the quality and usability of your code.

Exercise 10.3.1: Identifying Incorrect Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will analyze a given code snippet and identify the incorrect naming conventions. Then, you'll correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Identify the incorrect naming conventions in the given code snippet.
  2. Correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.
class car:
    def __init__(self, make, Model, year):
        self.Make = make
        self.model = Model
        self.Year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.Year} {self.Make} {self.model}"

Solution:

class Car:
    def __init__(self, make, model, year):
        self.make = make
        self.model = model
        self.year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.year} {self.make} {self.model}"

Exercise 10.3.2: Applying Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will write a simple Python script that calculates the area of a circle using the proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Define a constant PI with a value of 3.14159.
  2. Create a function calculate_area(radius) that takes the radius as an argument and returns the area of a circle.
  3. Call the function with the radius of 5 and print the result.

Solution:

PI = 3.14159

def calculate_area(radius):
    return PI * radius ** 2

radius = 5
area = calculate_area(radius)
print(f"The area of the circle with radius {radius} is {area:.2f}")

Output:

The area of the circle with radius 5 is 78.54

Exercise 10.3.3: Refactoring Code with Proper Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will refactor a provided code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Refactor the given code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.
  2. Ensure that the code works correctly after refactoring.
class student:
    def __init__(s, name, age):
        s.Name = name
        s.age = age

    def display_info(s):
        print(f"Name: {s.Name}, Age: {s.age}")

stud = student("John", 20)
stud.display_info()

Solution:

class Student:
    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    def display_info(self):
        print(f"Name: {self.name}, Age: {self.age}")

student_instance = Student("John", 20)
student_instance.display_info()

Output:

Name: John, Age: 20

10.3: Naming Conventions

In Python, it is incredibly important to use clear and descriptive names for variables, functions, classes, and modules. Doing so will make your code more readable and maintainable, which is crucial for any project. However, it's not just about using descriptive names - it's also about being consistent throughout your code.

By adopting a consistent naming convention, you can help other developers understand and contribute to your project more efficiently. Luckily, As we described before, Python has a set of widely-accepted naming conventions, which are covered in PEP 8. This section will provide a more detailed discussion of these conventions, and how they can be applied to your code to make it more readable and maintainable.

10.3.1: Variables and functions:

Use lowercase letters and separate words with underscores (snake_case). This convention makes your code easy to read and understand. For example:

filename = "example.txt"
counter = 0

def process_data(data):
    pass

10.3.2: Constants: 

Constants should be named using uppercase letters and underscores to separate words. This convention makes it easy to distinguish constants from other variables.

PI = 3.14159
MAX_SIZE = 1000 

10.3.3: Classes:

Use CamelCase (capitalizing the first letter of each word) for class names. This convention helps distinguish class names from variable and function names.

class MyClass:
    pass

class CustomerData:
    pass

10.3.4: Modules:

Module names should be lowercase and can use underscores if it improves readability. This convention keeps module names consistent with variable and function names.

# my_module.py
import my_module

10.3.5: Private variables and methods:

To indicate that a variable or method is private (i.e., not meant to be accessed directly), you can use a single leading underscore. This is a convention rather than a strict rule, but it helps communicate the intended use of the variable or method to other developers.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self._private_variable = 42

    def _private_method(self):
        pass

By following these naming conventions, you'll improve the readability and maintainability of your Python code. This can save time and effort in the long run, especially when working in a team or revisiting code after a period of time. It's important to be consistent with these conventions throughout your codebase to ensure a coherent and professional appearance.

This consistency can also aid in debugging and troubleshooting, as well as reduce the likelihood of errors or confusion caused by inconsistent naming. Additionally, adhering to standard naming conventions can make it easier for others to understand and contribute to your code, as they will be familiar with the naming conventions used. Therefore, it's recommended to take the time to learn and follow these conventions, as they can have a significant impact on the quality and usability of your code.

Exercise 10.3.1: Identifying Incorrect Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will analyze a given code snippet and identify the incorrect naming conventions. Then, you'll correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Identify the incorrect naming conventions in the given code snippet.
  2. Correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.
class car:
    def __init__(self, make, Model, year):
        self.Make = make
        self.model = Model
        self.Year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.Year} {self.Make} {self.model}"

Solution:

class Car:
    def __init__(self, make, model, year):
        self.make = make
        self.model = model
        self.year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.year} {self.make} {self.model}"

Exercise 10.3.2: Applying Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will write a simple Python script that calculates the area of a circle using the proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Define a constant PI with a value of 3.14159.
  2. Create a function calculate_area(radius) that takes the radius as an argument and returns the area of a circle.
  3. Call the function with the radius of 5 and print the result.

Solution:

PI = 3.14159

def calculate_area(radius):
    return PI * radius ** 2

radius = 5
area = calculate_area(radius)
print(f"The area of the circle with radius {radius} is {area:.2f}")

Output:

The area of the circle with radius 5 is 78.54

Exercise 10.3.3: Refactoring Code with Proper Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will refactor a provided code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Refactor the given code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.
  2. Ensure that the code works correctly after refactoring.
class student:
    def __init__(s, name, age):
        s.Name = name
        s.age = age

    def display_info(s):
        print(f"Name: {s.Name}, Age: {s.age}")

stud = student("John", 20)
stud.display_info()

Solution:

class Student:
    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    def display_info(self):
        print(f"Name: {self.name}, Age: {self.age}")

student_instance = Student("John", 20)
student_instance.display_info()

Output:

Name: John, Age: 20

10.3: Naming Conventions

In Python, it is incredibly important to use clear and descriptive names for variables, functions, classes, and modules. Doing so will make your code more readable and maintainable, which is crucial for any project. However, it's not just about using descriptive names - it's also about being consistent throughout your code.

By adopting a consistent naming convention, you can help other developers understand and contribute to your project more efficiently. Luckily, As we described before, Python has a set of widely-accepted naming conventions, which are covered in PEP 8. This section will provide a more detailed discussion of these conventions, and how they can be applied to your code to make it more readable and maintainable.

10.3.1: Variables and functions:

Use lowercase letters and separate words with underscores (snake_case). This convention makes your code easy to read and understand. For example:

filename = "example.txt"
counter = 0

def process_data(data):
    pass

10.3.2: Constants: 

Constants should be named using uppercase letters and underscores to separate words. This convention makes it easy to distinguish constants from other variables.

PI = 3.14159
MAX_SIZE = 1000 

10.3.3: Classes:

Use CamelCase (capitalizing the first letter of each word) for class names. This convention helps distinguish class names from variable and function names.

class MyClass:
    pass

class CustomerData:
    pass

10.3.4: Modules:

Module names should be lowercase and can use underscores if it improves readability. This convention keeps module names consistent with variable and function names.

# my_module.py
import my_module

10.3.5: Private variables and methods:

To indicate that a variable or method is private (i.e., not meant to be accessed directly), you can use a single leading underscore. This is a convention rather than a strict rule, but it helps communicate the intended use of the variable or method to other developers.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self._private_variable = 42

    def _private_method(self):
        pass

By following these naming conventions, you'll improve the readability and maintainability of your Python code. This can save time and effort in the long run, especially when working in a team or revisiting code after a period of time. It's important to be consistent with these conventions throughout your codebase to ensure a coherent and professional appearance.

This consistency can also aid in debugging and troubleshooting, as well as reduce the likelihood of errors or confusion caused by inconsistent naming. Additionally, adhering to standard naming conventions can make it easier for others to understand and contribute to your code, as they will be familiar with the naming conventions used. Therefore, it's recommended to take the time to learn and follow these conventions, as they can have a significant impact on the quality and usability of your code.

Exercise 10.3.1: Identifying Incorrect Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will analyze a given code snippet and identify the incorrect naming conventions. Then, you'll correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Identify the incorrect naming conventions in the given code snippet.
  2. Correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.
class car:
    def __init__(self, make, Model, year):
        self.Make = make
        self.model = Model
        self.Year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.Year} {self.Make} {self.model}"

Solution:

class Car:
    def __init__(self, make, model, year):
        self.make = make
        self.model = model
        self.year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.year} {self.make} {self.model}"

Exercise 10.3.2: Applying Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will write a simple Python script that calculates the area of a circle using the proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Define a constant PI with a value of 3.14159.
  2. Create a function calculate_area(radius) that takes the radius as an argument and returns the area of a circle.
  3. Call the function with the radius of 5 and print the result.

Solution:

PI = 3.14159

def calculate_area(radius):
    return PI * radius ** 2

radius = 5
area = calculate_area(radius)
print(f"The area of the circle with radius {radius} is {area:.2f}")

Output:

The area of the circle with radius 5 is 78.54

Exercise 10.3.3: Refactoring Code with Proper Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will refactor a provided code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Refactor the given code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.
  2. Ensure that the code works correctly after refactoring.
class student:
    def __init__(s, name, age):
        s.Name = name
        s.age = age

    def display_info(s):
        print(f"Name: {s.Name}, Age: {s.age}")

stud = student("John", 20)
stud.display_info()

Solution:

class Student:
    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    def display_info(self):
        print(f"Name: {self.name}, Age: {self.age}")

student_instance = Student("John", 20)
student_instance.display_info()

Output:

Name: John, Age: 20

10.3: Naming Conventions

In Python, it is incredibly important to use clear and descriptive names for variables, functions, classes, and modules. Doing so will make your code more readable and maintainable, which is crucial for any project. However, it's not just about using descriptive names - it's also about being consistent throughout your code.

By adopting a consistent naming convention, you can help other developers understand and contribute to your project more efficiently. Luckily, As we described before, Python has a set of widely-accepted naming conventions, which are covered in PEP 8. This section will provide a more detailed discussion of these conventions, and how they can be applied to your code to make it more readable and maintainable.

10.3.1: Variables and functions:

Use lowercase letters and separate words with underscores (snake_case). This convention makes your code easy to read and understand. For example:

filename = "example.txt"
counter = 0

def process_data(data):
    pass

10.3.2: Constants: 

Constants should be named using uppercase letters and underscores to separate words. This convention makes it easy to distinguish constants from other variables.

PI = 3.14159
MAX_SIZE = 1000 

10.3.3: Classes:

Use CamelCase (capitalizing the first letter of each word) for class names. This convention helps distinguish class names from variable and function names.

class MyClass:
    pass

class CustomerData:
    pass

10.3.4: Modules:

Module names should be lowercase and can use underscores if it improves readability. This convention keeps module names consistent with variable and function names.

# my_module.py
import my_module

10.3.5: Private variables and methods:

To indicate that a variable or method is private (i.e., not meant to be accessed directly), you can use a single leading underscore. This is a convention rather than a strict rule, but it helps communicate the intended use of the variable or method to other developers.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self._private_variable = 42

    def _private_method(self):
        pass

By following these naming conventions, you'll improve the readability and maintainability of your Python code. This can save time and effort in the long run, especially when working in a team or revisiting code after a period of time. It's important to be consistent with these conventions throughout your codebase to ensure a coherent and professional appearance.

This consistency can also aid in debugging and troubleshooting, as well as reduce the likelihood of errors or confusion caused by inconsistent naming. Additionally, adhering to standard naming conventions can make it easier for others to understand and contribute to your code, as they will be familiar with the naming conventions used. Therefore, it's recommended to take the time to learn and follow these conventions, as they can have a significant impact on the quality and usability of your code.

Exercise 10.3.1: Identifying Incorrect Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will analyze a given code snippet and identify the incorrect naming conventions. Then, you'll correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Identify the incorrect naming conventions in the given code snippet.
  2. Correct the code to follow proper naming conventions.
class car:
    def __init__(self, make, Model, year):
        self.Make = make
        self.model = Model
        self.Year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.Year} {self.Make} {self.model}"

Solution:

class Car:
    def __init__(self, make, model, year):
        self.make = make
        self.model = model
        self.year = year

    def get_car_info(self):
        return f"{self.year} {self.make} {self.model}"

Exercise 10.3.2: Applying Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will write a simple Python script that calculates the area of a circle using the proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Define a constant PI with a value of 3.14159.
  2. Create a function calculate_area(radius) that takes the radius as an argument and returns the area of a circle.
  3. Call the function with the radius of 5 and print the result.

Solution:

PI = 3.14159

def calculate_area(radius):
    return PI * radius ** 2

radius = 5
area = calculate_area(radius)
print(f"The area of the circle with radius {radius} is {area:.2f}")

Output:

The area of the circle with radius 5 is 78.54

Exercise 10.3.3: Refactoring Code with Proper Naming Conventions

In this exercise, you will refactor a provided code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.

Instructions:

  1. Refactor the given code snippet by applying proper naming conventions.
  2. Ensure that the code works correctly after refactoring.
class student:
    def __init__(s, name, age):
        s.Name = name
        s.age = age

    def display_info(s):
        print(f"Name: {s.Name}, Age: {s.age}")

stud = student("John", 20)
stud.display_info()

Solution:

class Student:
    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age

    def display_info(self):
        print(f"Name: {self.name}, Age: {self.age}")

student_instance = Student("John", 20)
student_instance.display_info()

Output:

Name: John, Age: 20