Menu iconMenu iconPython & SQL Bible
Python & SQL Bible

Chapter 12: Introduction to SQL

12.1 Brief History of SQL

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a widely used programming language for managing data stored in relational database management systems (RDBMS). SQL is an essential tool for data management, allowing users to retrieve, update, and manipulate data efficiently. In this chapter, we will explore the history of SQL, its evolution over the decades, and its importance in today's world of data management.

SQL was first developed in the early 1970s by IBM researchers Raymond Boyce and Donald Chamberlin. Originally called SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language), it was designed to be a user-friendly language for managing data stored in IBM's System R, an early relational database management system. SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to trademark issues.

Over the years, SQL has evolved into a standard language for managing data in RDBMS, and is now widely used in the industry. SQL allows users to perform various operations on the data such as filtering, sorting, and aggregating. With the increasing importance of data in today's world, SQL has become an essential tool for businesses and organizations to manage and analyze their data effectively.

The origins of SQL date back to the 1970s at the IBM Research Center. The language was initially developed by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce, who initially named it SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language). SEQUEL was a part of a larger project at IBM named System R, which aimed to design and implement a prototype RDBMS. The project was influenced by the relational model proposed by Dr. E. F. Codd, also from IBM, who set the foundational principles for organizing and interacting with data in relational databases.

SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to a trademark conflict. Over the years, SQL has been adopted and expanded upon by different database management system vendors, such as Oracle, Microsoft, and MySQL. The standardization of SQL started in the 1980s, with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) playing significant roles in this process.

The first standard SQL-86 was published in 1986. Over the years, new features and improvements have been added to the language through subsequent versions such as SQL-92 (considered as the baseline of SQL languages), SQL:1999 (introduced recursive queries and triggers), SQL:2003 (added support for XML), and the most recent, SQL:2016, among others.

It's important to note that while there is a standard SQL, many database management systems implement their own extensions and variations to the language. These variations often provide additional functionality but can lead to a lack of portability between different systems. The SQL code written for one system may not run on another, or it may produce different results.

Today, SQL is the de-facto language for interacting with relational databases. Whether you are a data analyst, data scientist, developer, or database administrator, knowledge of SQL is a must-have skill.

In the next section, we will look at the basic structure of a SQL query and understand how we can retrieve data from a database. Get ready to dive into the exciting world of SQL!

Please note: SQL code examples in this chapter assume a hypothetical database for illustrative purposes. Depending on your database setup and the data it contains, you might need to modify the SQL queries accordingly.

12.1 Brief History of SQL

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a widely used programming language for managing data stored in relational database management systems (RDBMS). SQL is an essential tool for data management, allowing users to retrieve, update, and manipulate data efficiently. In this chapter, we will explore the history of SQL, its evolution over the decades, and its importance in today's world of data management.

SQL was first developed in the early 1970s by IBM researchers Raymond Boyce and Donald Chamberlin. Originally called SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language), it was designed to be a user-friendly language for managing data stored in IBM's System R, an early relational database management system. SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to trademark issues.

Over the years, SQL has evolved into a standard language for managing data in RDBMS, and is now widely used in the industry. SQL allows users to perform various operations on the data such as filtering, sorting, and aggregating. With the increasing importance of data in today's world, SQL has become an essential tool for businesses and organizations to manage and analyze their data effectively.

The origins of SQL date back to the 1970s at the IBM Research Center. The language was initially developed by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce, who initially named it SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language). SEQUEL was a part of a larger project at IBM named System R, which aimed to design and implement a prototype RDBMS. The project was influenced by the relational model proposed by Dr. E. F. Codd, also from IBM, who set the foundational principles for organizing and interacting with data in relational databases.

SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to a trademark conflict. Over the years, SQL has been adopted and expanded upon by different database management system vendors, such as Oracle, Microsoft, and MySQL. The standardization of SQL started in the 1980s, with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) playing significant roles in this process.

The first standard SQL-86 was published in 1986. Over the years, new features and improvements have been added to the language through subsequent versions such as SQL-92 (considered as the baseline of SQL languages), SQL:1999 (introduced recursive queries and triggers), SQL:2003 (added support for XML), and the most recent, SQL:2016, among others.

It's important to note that while there is a standard SQL, many database management systems implement their own extensions and variations to the language. These variations often provide additional functionality but can lead to a lack of portability between different systems. The SQL code written for one system may not run on another, or it may produce different results.

Today, SQL is the de-facto language for interacting with relational databases. Whether you are a data analyst, data scientist, developer, or database administrator, knowledge of SQL is a must-have skill.

In the next section, we will look at the basic structure of a SQL query and understand how we can retrieve data from a database. Get ready to dive into the exciting world of SQL!

Please note: SQL code examples in this chapter assume a hypothetical database for illustrative purposes. Depending on your database setup and the data it contains, you might need to modify the SQL queries accordingly.

12.1 Brief History of SQL

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a widely used programming language for managing data stored in relational database management systems (RDBMS). SQL is an essential tool for data management, allowing users to retrieve, update, and manipulate data efficiently. In this chapter, we will explore the history of SQL, its evolution over the decades, and its importance in today's world of data management.

SQL was first developed in the early 1970s by IBM researchers Raymond Boyce and Donald Chamberlin. Originally called SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language), it was designed to be a user-friendly language for managing data stored in IBM's System R, an early relational database management system. SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to trademark issues.

Over the years, SQL has evolved into a standard language for managing data in RDBMS, and is now widely used in the industry. SQL allows users to perform various operations on the data such as filtering, sorting, and aggregating. With the increasing importance of data in today's world, SQL has become an essential tool for businesses and organizations to manage and analyze their data effectively.

The origins of SQL date back to the 1970s at the IBM Research Center. The language was initially developed by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce, who initially named it SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language). SEQUEL was a part of a larger project at IBM named System R, which aimed to design and implement a prototype RDBMS. The project was influenced by the relational model proposed by Dr. E. F. Codd, also from IBM, who set the foundational principles for organizing and interacting with data in relational databases.

SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to a trademark conflict. Over the years, SQL has been adopted and expanded upon by different database management system vendors, such as Oracle, Microsoft, and MySQL. The standardization of SQL started in the 1980s, with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) playing significant roles in this process.

The first standard SQL-86 was published in 1986. Over the years, new features and improvements have been added to the language through subsequent versions such as SQL-92 (considered as the baseline of SQL languages), SQL:1999 (introduced recursive queries and triggers), SQL:2003 (added support for XML), and the most recent, SQL:2016, among others.

It's important to note that while there is a standard SQL, many database management systems implement their own extensions and variations to the language. These variations often provide additional functionality but can lead to a lack of portability between different systems. The SQL code written for one system may not run on another, or it may produce different results.

Today, SQL is the de-facto language for interacting with relational databases. Whether you are a data analyst, data scientist, developer, or database administrator, knowledge of SQL is a must-have skill.

In the next section, we will look at the basic structure of a SQL query and understand how we can retrieve data from a database. Get ready to dive into the exciting world of SQL!

Please note: SQL code examples in this chapter assume a hypothetical database for illustrative purposes. Depending on your database setup and the data it contains, you might need to modify the SQL queries accordingly.

12.1 Brief History of SQL

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a widely used programming language for managing data stored in relational database management systems (RDBMS). SQL is an essential tool for data management, allowing users to retrieve, update, and manipulate data efficiently. In this chapter, we will explore the history of SQL, its evolution over the decades, and its importance in today's world of data management.

SQL was first developed in the early 1970s by IBM researchers Raymond Boyce and Donald Chamberlin. Originally called SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language), it was designed to be a user-friendly language for managing data stored in IBM's System R, an early relational database management system. SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to trademark issues.

Over the years, SQL has evolved into a standard language for managing data in RDBMS, and is now widely used in the industry. SQL allows users to perform various operations on the data such as filtering, sorting, and aggregating. With the increasing importance of data in today's world, SQL has become an essential tool for businesses and organizations to manage and analyze their data effectively.

The origins of SQL date back to the 1970s at the IBM Research Center. The language was initially developed by Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce, who initially named it SEQUEL (Structured English Query Language). SEQUEL was a part of a larger project at IBM named System R, which aimed to design and implement a prototype RDBMS. The project was influenced by the relational model proposed by Dr. E. F. Codd, also from IBM, who set the foundational principles for organizing and interacting with data in relational databases.

SEQUEL was later renamed SQL due to a trademark conflict. Over the years, SQL has been adopted and expanded upon by different database management system vendors, such as Oracle, Microsoft, and MySQL. The standardization of SQL started in the 1980s, with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) playing significant roles in this process.

The first standard SQL-86 was published in 1986. Over the years, new features and improvements have been added to the language through subsequent versions such as SQL-92 (considered as the baseline of SQL languages), SQL:1999 (introduced recursive queries and triggers), SQL:2003 (added support for XML), and the most recent, SQL:2016, among others.

It's important to note that while there is a standard SQL, many database management systems implement their own extensions and variations to the language. These variations often provide additional functionality but can lead to a lack of portability between different systems. The SQL code written for one system may not run on another, or it may produce different results.

Today, SQL is the de-facto language for interacting with relational databases. Whether you are a data analyst, data scientist, developer, or database administrator, knowledge of SQL is a must-have skill.

In the next section, we will look at the basic structure of a SQL query and understand how we can retrieve data from a database. Get ready to dive into the exciting world of SQL!

Please note: SQL code examples in this chapter assume a hypothetical database for illustrative purposes. Depending on your database setup and the data it contains, you might need to modify the SQL queries accordingly.