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Python & SQL Bible

Chapter 13: SQL Basics

13.6 Filtering and Sorting Query Results

When working with SQL, you will often need to choose specific data from a table. This can be done using the SELECT statement, which can then be followed by the WHERE clause to filter the data and the ORDER BY clause to sort it.

The WHERE clause allows you to specify conditions that must be met for a particular row to be included in the results. For example, you can use the WHERE clause to select only the rows where the value in a certain column is greater than a specific number. The ORDER BY clause, on the other hand, allows you to sort the selected data based on a particular column.

You can specify whether the data should be sorted in ascending or descending order, and you can even sort by multiple columns at once. These two methods are some of the most common and powerful ways to manipulate data in SQL, and mastering them will allow you to perform more complex queries and analyses.

Example:

The WHERE clause allows you to filter results based on one or more conditions. For example, to select only those books that cost less than $8.00, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
WHERE Price < 8.00;

The ORDER BY clause allows you to sort the results of your query. You can sort by any column and specify whether to sort in ascending (ASC) or descending (DESC) order. For example, to select all books sorted by price in descending order, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
ORDER BY Price DESC;

Try these operations on your own to solidify your understanding of these SQL basics. In the next sections, we'll go deeper into more advanced SQL topics.

13.6 Filtering and Sorting Query Results

When working with SQL, you will often need to choose specific data from a table. This can be done using the SELECT statement, which can then be followed by the WHERE clause to filter the data and the ORDER BY clause to sort it.

The WHERE clause allows you to specify conditions that must be met for a particular row to be included in the results. For example, you can use the WHERE clause to select only the rows where the value in a certain column is greater than a specific number. The ORDER BY clause, on the other hand, allows you to sort the selected data based on a particular column.

You can specify whether the data should be sorted in ascending or descending order, and you can even sort by multiple columns at once. These two methods are some of the most common and powerful ways to manipulate data in SQL, and mastering them will allow you to perform more complex queries and analyses.

Example:

The WHERE clause allows you to filter results based on one or more conditions. For example, to select only those books that cost less than $8.00, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
WHERE Price < 8.00;

The ORDER BY clause allows you to sort the results of your query. You can sort by any column and specify whether to sort in ascending (ASC) or descending (DESC) order. For example, to select all books sorted by price in descending order, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
ORDER BY Price DESC;

Try these operations on your own to solidify your understanding of these SQL basics. In the next sections, we'll go deeper into more advanced SQL topics.

13.6 Filtering and Sorting Query Results

When working with SQL, you will often need to choose specific data from a table. This can be done using the SELECT statement, which can then be followed by the WHERE clause to filter the data and the ORDER BY clause to sort it.

The WHERE clause allows you to specify conditions that must be met for a particular row to be included in the results. For example, you can use the WHERE clause to select only the rows where the value in a certain column is greater than a specific number. The ORDER BY clause, on the other hand, allows you to sort the selected data based on a particular column.

You can specify whether the data should be sorted in ascending or descending order, and you can even sort by multiple columns at once. These two methods are some of the most common and powerful ways to manipulate data in SQL, and mastering them will allow you to perform more complex queries and analyses.

Example:

The WHERE clause allows you to filter results based on one or more conditions. For example, to select only those books that cost less than $8.00, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
WHERE Price < 8.00;

The ORDER BY clause allows you to sort the results of your query. You can sort by any column and specify whether to sort in ascending (ASC) or descending (DESC) order. For example, to select all books sorted by price in descending order, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
ORDER BY Price DESC;

Try these operations on your own to solidify your understanding of these SQL basics. In the next sections, we'll go deeper into more advanced SQL topics.

13.6 Filtering and Sorting Query Results

When working with SQL, you will often need to choose specific data from a table. This can be done using the SELECT statement, which can then be followed by the WHERE clause to filter the data and the ORDER BY clause to sort it.

The WHERE clause allows you to specify conditions that must be met for a particular row to be included in the results. For example, you can use the WHERE clause to select only the rows where the value in a certain column is greater than a specific number. The ORDER BY clause, on the other hand, allows you to sort the selected data based on a particular column.

You can specify whether the data should be sorted in ascending or descending order, and you can even sort by multiple columns at once. These two methods are some of the most common and powerful ways to manipulate data in SQL, and mastering them will allow you to perform more complex queries and analyses.

Example:

The WHERE clause allows you to filter results based on one or more conditions. For example, to select only those books that cost less than $8.00, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
WHERE Price < 8.00;

The ORDER BY clause allows you to sort the results of your query. You can sort by any column and specify whether to sort in ascending (ASC) or descending (DESC) order. For example, to select all books sorted by price in descending order, you would use:

SELECT * FROM Books
ORDER BY Price DESC;

Try these operations on your own to solidify your understanding of these SQL basics. In the next sections, we'll go deeper into more advanced SQL topics.