Menu iconMenu iconGenerative Deep Learning with Python
Generative Deep Learning with Python

Chapter 4: Project: Face Generation with GANs

4.1 Data Collection and Preprocessing

Welcome to Chapter 4, where we put theory into practice by taking on a project on face generation with GANs. Having covered the theory behind GANs in detail in the previous chapter, this project-based chapter will help solidify your understanding of how to implement and use GANs for real-world applications. 

Our main aim in this project is to develop a GAN model that can generate realistic human faces. This involves the entire workflow of a typical machine learning project, starting with data collection and preprocessing, through model development, training, and finally evaluation of the results. Throughout the chapter, we will provide code examples and explain each step in the process in detail.

Let's begin with the first step: Data Collection and Preprocessing.

Data is the lifeblood of machine learning models. Good data leads to good models. When it comes to generative models like GANs, we need a substantial amount of data to learn the underlying distribution. For our face generation project, we require a dataset of human faces.

One popular dataset for this purpose is the CelebA dataset (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA.html). It contains over 200,000 celebrity images centered on the face and reasonably uniform. This publicly available dataset has been widely used in many face-related machine learning projects.

To download and use the CelebA dataset in our project, we can use the code snippet below:

# Note: The actual download link might be different. Please refer to the official CelebA website.
!wget https://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA/Dataset/CelebA.zip
!unzip CelebA.zip

Once we have the dataset, the next step is preprocessing. Preprocessing involves getting the data into a suitable format that can be fed into our GAN. This might involve resizing images, normalizing pixel values, etc. For our project, we will resize all images to 64x64 and normalize the pixel values to be in the range [-1, 1]. The preprocessing can be done using the following code:

from PIL import Image
import os
import numpy as np

def preprocess_images(image_path):
"""
Function to preprocess images: resize and normalize
"""
# Load image
img = Image.open(image_path)

# Resize to 64x64
img = img.resize((64, 64))

# Convert to numpy array and normalize
img_array = np.array(img)
img_array = img_array / 127.5 - 1

return img_array

# Path to CelebA dataset
dataset_path = "/path/to/CelebA/dataset"

# Get list of all images
image_paths = os.listdir(dataset_path)

# Preprocess all images
images = [preprocess_images(os.path.join(dataset_path, img_path)) for img_path in image_paths]

After executing the above code, we have a list of preprocessed images ready to be used for training our GAN. In the next section, we will discuss how to create a GAN for our face generation task.

NOTE: Remember that using datasets like CelebA requires adherence to their usage terms and conditions, especially regarding privacy and ethical considerations.

4.1.1 Dataset Splitting

Before we move on to creating our GAN model, we need to split our data into a training set and a validation set. The training set is used to train the model, while the validation set is used to evaluate the model's performance on unseen data during the training process. This helps us monitor if the model is overfitting to the training data.

In most cases, we split the data into 80% training and 20% validation. However, because GANs typically do not use a validation set in the traditional sense (since they do not need labelled data), we will use all the data for training in this case.

This is a deviation from the usual practice, but remember that GANs are generative models and the concept of "overfitting" can be a bit different here compared to discriminative models (like a standard neural network). The idea is to make the GAN learn the data distribution as best as it can.

So, although we are not doing a traditional train-validation split here, understanding the concept is important for most other machine learning models. In such cases, the split can be easily achieved using scikit-learn's train_test_split function, as shown in the example code snippet below:

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

# Convert list of images to numpy array
images = np.array(images)

# Split the data into training and validation sets (not applicable for GANs)
# train_images, val_images = train_test_split(images, test_size=0.2, random_state=42)

With the data collection, preprocessing, and understanding of dataset splitting complete, we're ready to dive into the next step: creating our GAN model!

Please remember that the above code of splitting the dataset into training and validation is not necessary for GANs, but it's crucial to understand this process as it's a standard procedure in many other machine learning projects.

4.1 Data Collection and Preprocessing

Welcome to Chapter 4, where we put theory into practice by taking on a project on face generation with GANs. Having covered the theory behind GANs in detail in the previous chapter, this project-based chapter will help solidify your understanding of how to implement and use GANs for real-world applications. 

Our main aim in this project is to develop a GAN model that can generate realistic human faces. This involves the entire workflow of a typical machine learning project, starting with data collection and preprocessing, through model development, training, and finally evaluation of the results. Throughout the chapter, we will provide code examples and explain each step in the process in detail.

Let's begin with the first step: Data Collection and Preprocessing.

Data is the lifeblood of machine learning models. Good data leads to good models. When it comes to generative models like GANs, we need a substantial amount of data to learn the underlying distribution. For our face generation project, we require a dataset of human faces.

One popular dataset for this purpose is the CelebA dataset (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA.html). It contains over 200,000 celebrity images centered on the face and reasonably uniform. This publicly available dataset has been widely used in many face-related machine learning projects.

To download and use the CelebA dataset in our project, we can use the code snippet below:

# Note: The actual download link might be different. Please refer to the official CelebA website.
!wget https://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA/Dataset/CelebA.zip
!unzip CelebA.zip

Once we have the dataset, the next step is preprocessing. Preprocessing involves getting the data into a suitable format that can be fed into our GAN. This might involve resizing images, normalizing pixel values, etc. For our project, we will resize all images to 64x64 and normalize the pixel values to be in the range [-1, 1]. The preprocessing can be done using the following code:

from PIL import Image
import os
import numpy as np

def preprocess_images(image_path):
"""
Function to preprocess images: resize and normalize
"""
# Load image
img = Image.open(image_path)

# Resize to 64x64
img = img.resize((64, 64))

# Convert to numpy array and normalize
img_array = np.array(img)
img_array = img_array / 127.5 - 1

return img_array

# Path to CelebA dataset
dataset_path = "/path/to/CelebA/dataset"

# Get list of all images
image_paths = os.listdir(dataset_path)

# Preprocess all images
images = [preprocess_images(os.path.join(dataset_path, img_path)) for img_path in image_paths]

After executing the above code, we have a list of preprocessed images ready to be used for training our GAN. In the next section, we will discuss how to create a GAN for our face generation task.

NOTE: Remember that using datasets like CelebA requires adherence to their usage terms and conditions, especially regarding privacy and ethical considerations.

4.1.1 Dataset Splitting

Before we move on to creating our GAN model, we need to split our data into a training set and a validation set. The training set is used to train the model, while the validation set is used to evaluate the model's performance on unseen data during the training process. This helps us monitor if the model is overfitting to the training data.

In most cases, we split the data into 80% training and 20% validation. However, because GANs typically do not use a validation set in the traditional sense (since they do not need labelled data), we will use all the data for training in this case.

This is a deviation from the usual practice, but remember that GANs are generative models and the concept of "overfitting" can be a bit different here compared to discriminative models (like a standard neural network). The idea is to make the GAN learn the data distribution as best as it can.

So, although we are not doing a traditional train-validation split here, understanding the concept is important for most other machine learning models. In such cases, the split can be easily achieved using scikit-learn's train_test_split function, as shown in the example code snippet below:

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

# Convert list of images to numpy array
images = np.array(images)

# Split the data into training and validation sets (not applicable for GANs)
# train_images, val_images = train_test_split(images, test_size=0.2, random_state=42)

With the data collection, preprocessing, and understanding of dataset splitting complete, we're ready to dive into the next step: creating our GAN model!

Please remember that the above code of splitting the dataset into training and validation is not necessary for GANs, but it's crucial to understand this process as it's a standard procedure in many other machine learning projects.

4.1 Data Collection and Preprocessing

Welcome to Chapter 4, where we put theory into practice by taking on a project on face generation with GANs. Having covered the theory behind GANs in detail in the previous chapter, this project-based chapter will help solidify your understanding of how to implement and use GANs for real-world applications. 

Our main aim in this project is to develop a GAN model that can generate realistic human faces. This involves the entire workflow of a typical machine learning project, starting with data collection and preprocessing, through model development, training, and finally evaluation of the results. Throughout the chapter, we will provide code examples and explain each step in the process in detail.

Let's begin with the first step: Data Collection and Preprocessing.

Data is the lifeblood of machine learning models. Good data leads to good models. When it comes to generative models like GANs, we need a substantial amount of data to learn the underlying distribution. For our face generation project, we require a dataset of human faces.

One popular dataset for this purpose is the CelebA dataset (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA.html). It contains over 200,000 celebrity images centered on the face and reasonably uniform. This publicly available dataset has been widely used in many face-related machine learning projects.

To download and use the CelebA dataset in our project, we can use the code snippet below:

# Note: The actual download link might be different. Please refer to the official CelebA website.
!wget https://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA/Dataset/CelebA.zip
!unzip CelebA.zip

Once we have the dataset, the next step is preprocessing. Preprocessing involves getting the data into a suitable format that can be fed into our GAN. This might involve resizing images, normalizing pixel values, etc. For our project, we will resize all images to 64x64 and normalize the pixel values to be in the range [-1, 1]. The preprocessing can be done using the following code:

from PIL import Image
import os
import numpy as np

def preprocess_images(image_path):
"""
Function to preprocess images: resize and normalize
"""
# Load image
img = Image.open(image_path)

# Resize to 64x64
img = img.resize((64, 64))

# Convert to numpy array and normalize
img_array = np.array(img)
img_array = img_array / 127.5 - 1

return img_array

# Path to CelebA dataset
dataset_path = "/path/to/CelebA/dataset"

# Get list of all images
image_paths = os.listdir(dataset_path)

# Preprocess all images
images = [preprocess_images(os.path.join(dataset_path, img_path)) for img_path in image_paths]

After executing the above code, we have a list of preprocessed images ready to be used for training our GAN. In the next section, we will discuss how to create a GAN for our face generation task.

NOTE: Remember that using datasets like CelebA requires adherence to their usage terms and conditions, especially regarding privacy and ethical considerations.

4.1.1 Dataset Splitting

Before we move on to creating our GAN model, we need to split our data into a training set and a validation set. The training set is used to train the model, while the validation set is used to evaluate the model's performance on unseen data during the training process. This helps us monitor if the model is overfitting to the training data.

In most cases, we split the data into 80% training and 20% validation. However, because GANs typically do not use a validation set in the traditional sense (since they do not need labelled data), we will use all the data for training in this case.

This is a deviation from the usual practice, but remember that GANs are generative models and the concept of "overfitting" can be a bit different here compared to discriminative models (like a standard neural network). The idea is to make the GAN learn the data distribution as best as it can.

So, although we are not doing a traditional train-validation split here, understanding the concept is important for most other machine learning models. In such cases, the split can be easily achieved using scikit-learn's train_test_split function, as shown in the example code snippet below:

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

# Convert list of images to numpy array
images = np.array(images)

# Split the data into training and validation sets (not applicable for GANs)
# train_images, val_images = train_test_split(images, test_size=0.2, random_state=42)

With the data collection, preprocessing, and understanding of dataset splitting complete, we're ready to dive into the next step: creating our GAN model!

Please remember that the above code of splitting the dataset into training and validation is not necessary for GANs, but it's crucial to understand this process as it's a standard procedure in many other machine learning projects.

4.1 Data Collection and Preprocessing

Welcome to Chapter 4, where we put theory into practice by taking on a project on face generation with GANs. Having covered the theory behind GANs in detail in the previous chapter, this project-based chapter will help solidify your understanding of how to implement and use GANs for real-world applications. 

Our main aim in this project is to develop a GAN model that can generate realistic human faces. This involves the entire workflow of a typical machine learning project, starting with data collection and preprocessing, through model development, training, and finally evaluation of the results. Throughout the chapter, we will provide code examples and explain each step in the process in detail.

Let's begin with the first step: Data Collection and Preprocessing.

Data is the lifeblood of machine learning models. Good data leads to good models. When it comes to generative models like GANs, we need a substantial amount of data to learn the underlying distribution. For our face generation project, we require a dataset of human faces.

One popular dataset for this purpose is the CelebA dataset (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA.html). It contains over 200,000 celebrity images centered on the face and reasonably uniform. This publicly available dataset has been widely used in many face-related machine learning projects.

To download and use the CelebA dataset in our project, we can use the code snippet below:

# Note: The actual download link might be different. Please refer to the official CelebA website.
!wget https://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/projects/CelebA/Dataset/CelebA.zip
!unzip CelebA.zip

Once we have the dataset, the next step is preprocessing. Preprocessing involves getting the data into a suitable format that can be fed into our GAN. This might involve resizing images, normalizing pixel values, etc. For our project, we will resize all images to 64x64 and normalize the pixel values to be in the range [-1, 1]. The preprocessing can be done using the following code:

from PIL import Image
import os
import numpy as np

def preprocess_images(image_path):
"""
Function to preprocess images: resize and normalize
"""
# Load image
img = Image.open(image_path)

# Resize to 64x64
img = img.resize((64, 64))

# Convert to numpy array and normalize
img_array = np.array(img)
img_array = img_array / 127.5 - 1

return img_array

# Path to CelebA dataset
dataset_path = "/path/to/CelebA/dataset"

# Get list of all images
image_paths = os.listdir(dataset_path)

# Preprocess all images
images = [preprocess_images(os.path.join(dataset_path, img_path)) for img_path in image_paths]

After executing the above code, we have a list of preprocessed images ready to be used for training our GAN. In the next section, we will discuss how to create a GAN for our face generation task.

NOTE: Remember that using datasets like CelebA requires adherence to their usage terms and conditions, especially regarding privacy and ethical considerations.

4.1.1 Dataset Splitting

Before we move on to creating our GAN model, we need to split our data into a training set and a validation set. The training set is used to train the model, while the validation set is used to evaluate the model's performance on unseen data during the training process. This helps us monitor if the model is overfitting to the training data.

In most cases, we split the data into 80% training and 20% validation. However, because GANs typically do not use a validation set in the traditional sense (since they do not need labelled data), we will use all the data for training in this case.

This is a deviation from the usual practice, but remember that GANs are generative models and the concept of "overfitting" can be a bit different here compared to discriminative models (like a standard neural network). The idea is to make the GAN learn the data distribution as best as it can.

So, although we are not doing a traditional train-validation split here, understanding the concept is important for most other machine learning models. In such cases, the split can be easily achieved using scikit-learn's train_test_split function, as shown in the example code snippet below:

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

# Convert list of images to numpy array
images = np.array(images)

# Split the data into training and validation sets (not applicable for GANs)
# train_images, val_images = train_test_split(images, test_size=0.2, random_state=42)

With the data collection, preprocessing, and understanding of dataset splitting complete, we're ready to dive into the next step: creating our GAN model!

Please remember that the above code of splitting the dataset into training and validation is not necessary for GANs, but it's crucial to understand this process as it's a standard procedure in many other machine learning projects.